Thursday, January 19, 2006

Interesting

Author and Storytellers Unplugged Kahuna Joseph Nassise's novel Heretic, the first book in The Templar Chronicles dark fantasy series, will be the first novel from a New York publisher to be podcast in its entirety starting January 31st. More details about signing up for the podcast are at The Templar Chronicles website here.

I think I'm the only writer left in the U.S. who has never listened to a podcast or used an iPod. Yeah, 'tis true. I like my Walkman. Anyway, what do you guys think of this podcasting stuff? Effective marketing move, or yet another vanity perk?

24 comments:

  1. You're not the only one who hasn't listened to a podcast or owns/tried an iPod. I like my MP3 player -- it does the job. I think it's great there's another choice, but it's a marketing strategy that will probably fail to reel me in.

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  2. I don't know.

    I listen when I stitch, but I doubt I'd seek out an author because he/she podcasts. I'm more likely to pick up on their podcast because I've read their books.

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  3. Well, looks like there are at least 3 of us :)

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  4. Ack! I don't need another book to read! But I visited the website, and I read the plot summary, and now how can I resist it?

    As for podcasts, the only podcast I've listened to is the NaNoWriMo podcast, and I think I only ever listened to the first one. I prefer reading stuff to listening to it. I think a lot of people do like listening to podcasts, though, so it could be an effective marketing move.

    I do have an MP3 player, but it's not an iPod.

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  5. I have an iPod, but I haven't listened to any podcasts on a regular basis. I tried one, but the sound quality was poor with a lot of echoes and static. I like the concept thought, especially for specific purposes like television commentary or academic lectures. For the every day person like me, however, making a podcast is kinda pointless when my blog is perfectly fine to do the same job of passing along information.

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  6. Make that four, Robin.

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  7. I got an iPod for Christmas and am absolutely addicted to podcasts -- humor, serialized books, short stories, interviews with authors, and more. You might check out Podiobooks.com and the author's reading of "Brave Men Run." Speaking as a reader, I know I will look for this author's books in the future. I also look for books by authors who have been interesting and entertaining on podcasts, too. Just my two cents' worth. I can recommend a few sample ones to listen to if you're interested; e-mail me at cbahm @ midsouth.rr.com and I'll drum up a list. ;o)

    Best rgds,
    Carolyn Bahm
    Collierville, TN

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  8. heather11:03 AM

    I know what an iPod is (though I have never listened to one), but I am not sure what a podcast is. I am assuming the two are connected somehow, but beyond that I have no idea. And given that logic and the fact I don't have an iPod, I never felt the urge to investigate.

    I suppose the time has come to check it out. You have piqued my interest.

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  9. Anonymous11:08 AM

    I don't have an iPod...I don't even have a cell phone! *grin*

    Misty

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  10. I have books on Ipod. So this is not that much of a strech. I think that this is more for the people who get books on CD or cassette. The other issue would be quality of the podcast.

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  11. First, just to clear up some misconceptions, podcasts do not require an iPod. They're simply mp3 files that can be played on any mp3 player or computer, or burned to CD and listened to in the car.

    I think podcasts are a great way to expose your work to new listeners. I know that it has worked for Scott Sigler with Earthcore, whose publishing deal fell through when the company went under. He got over 10,000 listeners and managed to get a new publishing deal with it. I know that through podiobooks.com I've found new authors that I wouldn't have otherwise. Just like blogs, it exposes you to people in new circles, which can, in turn, help with word of mouth.

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  12. I have a PDA that plays MP3s, and while Podcasts are free, I haven't bothered to download any. I guess I'm waiting to see if someone will actually recommend one to me before I do that. There are so many I wouldn't know where to start.

    The majority of what I listen to are audio books. As if I don't read enough books on writing, I now download them. Maybe I'm hoping I'll catch on after a while. :)

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  13. Since the request has been made for recomendations, here's a few writing related podcasts I've found that are fun to listen to, and often informative.

    Michael Stackpole's The Secrets. He's a published author (including a number of NYT Bestsellers.)

    Mur Lafferty's I Should Be Writing. Geared towards amateur writers.

    And Tee Morris' The Survival Guide To Writing Fantasy. Another published author, this podcast focuses more on promotion.

    Hope that helps.

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  14. Hmmmm. I might sign up for Joe's podcast just to see what the deal is.

    Michael wrote: First, just to clear up some misconceptions, podcasts do not require an iPod. They're simply mp3 files that can be played on any mp3 player or computer, or burned to CD and listened to in the car.

    Good info (not being a tech-head myself, I always thought podcasts were exclusively for iPod, like those e-books that only work if you use a particular e-reader.) Thanks also for the links, Michael.

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  15. I'm a reluctant techno-updater. I don't own an iPod or any MP3 player. Hell, I didn't get a DVD player for the house until this past summer - spurred by my nephew's visit. Didn't want to lose my 'cool aunt' status. I can't imagine wanting to download songs from the Internet. If I like an artist, I'll go buy the CD.

    I've listened to a few podcasts from websites through my computer, but that's about as far as I'm willing to go at the moment.

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  16. Another iPod Luddite here. I'll eventually get one, I just have not had any need for one yet, and that kind of luxury is just not in my budget right now.

    As far as podcasting goes, I consider another form of audio book. Cheaper to produce and distribute, so it might reach a wider audience.

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  17. Thanks for the links, Michael. The only podcast I've listened to is Holly's interview with DragonPage. I'll check those out, though.

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  18. iTunes has a reasonable selection of podcasts about a variety of writing. All the ones I saw are free, so it doesn't hurt to check them out. (And I'm quite sure you don't need an iPod to get free stuff at iTunes.)

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  19. I own an iPod. Just got it for X-mas. They're definitely addictive. I've been toying with the idea of putting together a podcast for my site. My problem is I'm just not sure how much time I can devote to it. I definitely think it's another avenue for marketing your work though.

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  20. I haven't listened to a podcast. I don't own an iPod. If I remember correctly, I only figured out what a blog was about a year ago.

    (*Doug grunts, scratches his butt, and walks away on his knuckles*)

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  21. You're not alone, I've no ipod, or mp3 player of any kind, and I've never listened to a podcast. Perhaps we're missing out on something good.

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  22. Another technology laggard reporting in here: no iPod, no podcast experience, no Walkman, mp3 player, no cell phone. Just got a cordless phone for the house ten months ago. I still stand by the base though as if I were still tethered by a six foot phone cord.

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  23. podcasts... uh... haven't heard of them.

    I want an ipod or something like it just becuase i'm tired of dropping my CD player at the gym and i figured something i strap to my arm will work better.

    I doubt I use mine for anything other than though.

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  24. Anonymous4:30 PM

    I don't mind them, but am not a big listener of them. Several authors I read do them, but I find that they try to hard to modulate their voice or try to sound cool, and that's just annoying.

    If you're going to do it, just be yourself. Talk like you were talking to a friend.

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